Frequently Asked Questions

What is an Ophthalmologist?

Dr. Barad is an ophthalmologist, or eye surgeon, who graduated from an accredited medical school with an M.D. and has completed extensive training in eye care beyond medical school and internship. As an ophthalmologist, she provides surgical and medical eyecare, including performing comprehensive medical eye examinations, diagnosing diseases and disorders of the eye, and using the appropriate medical, surgical, and laser procedures necessary for treatment.

What is an Optometrist?

An optometrist (Dr. Cecchini) is a doctor of optometry, licensed to practice in the specialty of eye health and vision care. The optometric education consists of four years of undergraduate college followed by four years in an optometry school. Optometrists are trained in eye care with a major emphasis on the diagnosis and treatment of eye diseases and the assessment of visual disturbances, including clinical patient care. Optometrists are licensed to diagnose and treat medical eye conditions.

What is an Optician?

An optician specializes in fitting glasses and is extremely knowledgeable in the latest lens materials, coatings, and finishing techniques for eyeglasses. An optician also has a tremendous amount of expertise in choosing frames that are right for each different facial shape and coloring.

I have tried eye drops for my dry eyes but they only work for a short time and are inconvenient to use. Is there anything else I can try?

Yes. We have had a lot of success treating people with dry eyes by closing off the tear duct with punctal plugs.  Punctal closure acts like putting a stopper in the drain of a sink. This keeps whatever tears you have from flowing out of the eye, increasing the moisture in your eye similar to the way the stopper prevents water from draining out of a sink. This procedures, with or without tear supplements, can be a big help for people with dry eyes where artificial bottled tear drops alone are not helping. Ask us about punctal closure if you want more information.

It takes me a minute or two to focus my eyes when I change to look at something off in the distance or try to read. I also notice that after I read for a while my eyes begin to ache and the print blurs and sometimes doubles. Is this normal?

Although these problems can result from dry eyes, often they are caused by weak eye muscles that are having a problem keeping your two eyes lined up properly to give the brain one clear image. If you are experiencing any symptoms like these, especially if your focusing problem is accompanied by intermittent blurred or double vision, then mention it to our doctors. You may need prism in your eyeglasses to improve your eye alignment. Prism is a special kind of lens added to eyeglasses which bends light making it easier for some eyes to focus.

I like small frames but now I need bifocals. Is there any way to put a progressive no-line bifocal in a small frame?

New progressive lenses, called “short corridor” progressives, are now available that allow us to fit this type of bifocal into the current fashionable smaller frames.

My eyes are often very tired after I read. Is this a sign that I need stronger eyeglasses?

It can be but this is also often a symptom of dry eyes. We suggest that you try artificial tear substitutes that can be purchased over the counter in the drugstore. These should be used when you are reading and can be placed in the eye as often as every hour for relief of the symptoms of dry eyes. Not all over-the-counter artificial tears are the same. Chemical additives and preservatives can sometimes cause irritation and some artificial tears can actually make your eyes feel worse. Look for those that have no preservatives, “disappearing preservatives”, or mild preservatives that have been proven safe. Our office can make recommendations for you. If you still are having problems after trying this then come in to have the strength of your eyeglasses checked and to make sure that you do not have any other eye problems.

I sometimes get a patterned distortion or blur in my vision that lasts for several minutes. Is this anything to worry about?

Visual patterns that last minutes to hours, with or without an associated headache, are often a form of migraine. These can be precipitated by stress, caffeine, or hormonal changes (among other causes). If we find that there isn’t an eye related reason for your symptoms (i.e. bring them into the office first), then you should see your medical doctor if these persist or worsen.

I have tried eye drops for my dry eyes but they only work for a short time and are inconvenient to use. Is there anything else I can try?

Yes. We have had a lot of success treating people with dry eyes by closing off the tear duct with punctal plugs. Punctal closure acts like putting a stopper in the drain of a sink. This keeps whatever tears you have from flowing out of the eye, increasing the moisture in your eye similar to the way the stopper prevents water from draining out of a sink. This procedures, with or without tear supplements, can be a big help for people with dry eyes where artificial bottled tear drops alone are not helping. Ask us about punctal closure if you want more information.

Sometimes Restasis eyedrops can improve the quality of the tears in your eyes. A newer treatment is IPL (Intense Pulsed Light). This is a device that transmits energy that can close down blood vessels that deliver irritants into the tear film. The treatment is done to the lower eyelid and upper cheek area and can have a profound effect on the comfort of the eyes. A medical evaluation is necessary to determine if these therapies should be considered for your particular dry eye condition. Sometimes trialling various modalities is appropriate.

I have tried eye drops for my dry eyes but they only work for a short time and are inconvenient to use. Is there anything else I can try?

Yes. We have had a lot of success treating people with dry eyes by closing off the tear duct with punctal plugs. Punctal closure acts like putting a stopper in the drain of a sink. This keeps whatever tears you have from flowing out of the eye, increasing the moisture in your eye similar to the way the stopper prevents water from draining out of a sink. This procedures, with or without tear supplements, can be a big help for people with dry eyes where artificial bottled tear drops alone are not helping. Ask us about punctal closure if you want more information.

Sometimes Restasis eyedrops can improve the quality of the tears in your eyes. A newer treatment is IPL (Intense Pulsed Light). This is a device that transmits energy that can close down blood vessels that deliver irritants into the tear film. The treatment is done to the lower eyelid and upper cheek area and can have a profound effect on the comfort of the eyes. A medical evaluation is necessary to determine if these therapies should be considered for your particular dry eye condition. Sometimes trialling various modalities is appropriate.