Macular Dysfunction Common In Diabetic Patients With No Macular Edema

Poor vision function common in all diabetic patients (Type 1 and 2)

A recent study revealed decreased retinal function in asymptomatic Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics with early diabetic retinal changes. A complete ophthalmologic examination found significantly reduced sensitivity in both Type 1 and 2 patients compared with healthy controls; with a greater reduction in sensitivity among Type 2 patients. Central retinal thickness (the part of the eye that gives us best vision) was increased in all diabetic patients compared with healthy controls, despite the absence of diabetic central retinal swelling.

These findings prove that in order for any diabetic to protect their vision, early control to prevent damage to eye tissue is imperative. The negative impact on eye function is permanent and not reversible.

Investigators evaluated retinal function in asymptomatic Type 1 and Type 2 diabetics with nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy and no clinical signs of diabetic macular edema. A complete ophthalmologic examination revealed significantly reduced sensitivity in both Type 1 and 2 patients compared with healthy controls; with a greater reduction in sensitivity among Type 2 patients. Central foveal thickness was increased in all diabetic patients compared with healthy controls, despite the absence of diabetic macular edema.
Retina, November